Ear, Nose, Throat (ENT) | Facial Plastic Surgery | Santa Clarita | Lancaster | Valencia
Ear, Nose, Throat (ENT) | Facial Plastic Surgery | Santa Clarita | Lancaster | Valencia Ear, Nose, Throat (ENT) | Facial Plastic Surgery | Santa Clarita | Lancaster | Valencia
Ear, Nose, Throat (ENT) | Facial Plastic Surgery | Santa Clarita | Lancaster | Valencia Ear, Nose, Throat (ENT) | Facial Plastic Surgery | Santa Clarita | Lancaster | Valencia Ear, Nose, Throat (ENT) | Facial Plastic Surgery | Santa Clarita | Lancaster | Valencia Ear, Nose, Throat (ENT) | Facial Plastic Surgery | Santa Clarita | Lancaster | Valencia

Nose and Sinuses

Chronic Nosebleeds Treatment

Nosebleeds are fairly common given the prominence of the nose on the face, as well as the rich network of capillaries contained within it. These make the nose susceptible to trauma and injury which may result in nosebleeds. Other factors include changes in weather, dry air, allergies, repeated nose blowing, or sinus infections.

The two types of nosebleeds are anterior and posterior. Anterior nosebleeds comprise 90% of all nosebleeds. The bleeding usually occurs in the anterior (front) of the nose and flows outward. Posterior nosebleeds are less common and usually occur in the elderly, people with high blood pressure, or those who suffer a facial or nose injury. The bleeding usually occurs in the posterior (back) of the nose and flows down the throat. These nosebleeds are generally more complicated and often require medical assistance.

While most people will experience at least one nosebleed at some point in their lives, some people may experience nosebleeds on a regular basis, which may occur as a result of certain medications or underlying conditions such as high blood pressure, abnormal blood vessels or liver disease. Common nosebleed causes such as trauma, dry air and sinus infections can also contribute to chronic nosebleeds.


Nasal Polyps Treatment

Nasal polyps are benign growths that develop within the lining of the nasal passages or sinuses. If large enough, these growths may block the passages and cause breathing difficulties, sinus infections or other complications.

Nasal polyps are most common in adults, especially those that have asthma or allergies. Children with cystic fibrosis are also at a higher risk of developing nasal polyps. They often develop in occurrence with respiratory diseases such as sinusitis and allergic rhinitis or immunodeficiency conditions.

Most patients with nasal polyps may experience nasal congestion, as well as runny nose, headache, facial pain, loss of smell or taste and sinus pressure. Some patients may not have any symptoms if the polyp is small.

Treatment for nasal polyps is often provided through medications that can reduce the size of the polyp or even eliminate it. Medication may be in the form of pills, nasal sprays or allergy shots. Surgery may be required to remove the polyp if medication is unsuccessful, and may include a polypectomy or endoscopic sinus surgery to either suction out the polyp or remove it carefully with tiny instruments.


Sinusitis Treatment

Sinusitis is a condition that refers to an inflammation of the lining within the paranasal sinuses. Sinusitis can be classified by location:

  • maxillary, which causes pain or pressure in the cheek area;
  • frontal, which causes pain or pressure above and behind the eyes;
  • ethmoid, which causes pain or pressure between or behind the eyes; and
  • sphenoid, which causes pain or pressure behind the eyes.

Sinusitis can also be classified by duration: acute lasts for four weeks or less, subacute lasts four to twelve weeks, chronic lasts more than twelve weeks, and recurrent, which consists of several acute attacks within a year.

Most acute cases of sinusitis are caused by an inflammation of the sinuses that eventually lead to a bacterial infection. With chronic sinusitis, the membranes of both the paranasal sinuses and the nose are thickened because they are constantly inflamed, possibly due to allergies, nasal polyps, or asthma.

Sinusitis can be treated through courses of antibiotics, decongestants, saline sprays, or in cases of severe chronic sinusitis, oral steroids. When pharmaceuticals fail, surgery may be an alternative. The goal of the surgery is to improve sinus drainage and reduce blockage. Thus, a surgeon will enlarge the opening of the sinuses, remove any polyps, and correct any defects that contribute to the nasal obstruction. While many people have fewer symptoms as a result of the surgery, many others experience a recurrence of their symptoms post-surgery.

 

To learn more about our Nose and Sinus treatments and to find out if they are right for you, please call 661-259-2500 today to schedule a consultation.

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